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our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
of positions. when we're in an environment where we've got 7.7% unemployment in this country, if you can get a job, take it. >> steve: if people want more information about the jobs we talked to -- >> casoneexchange.com. i went through a lot of cities. i have a lot of web sites where you can go and apply to every single company i went through today. we're going to talk about jobs on the business network because we do that every day. we need jobs to get the economy going. >> steve: thanks for giving us the business today. >> that's what i do. every tuesday. >> steve: it is. thanks. meanwhile, a gun store offering a rifle give aways on facebook. its page mysteriously shut down. sounds like facebook is getting political, doesn't it? we'll talk about that. mike jarrett, see the interview that made them lose it on tv next hour. >> he is good looking. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promise
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14